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What is a responsible breeder?


Queen Bitch
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Many people who come here don't know what a responsible, good breeder is. I say say give them a list! Could we make this stickey?

A responsible breeder:
- does not perpetuate that a crossbreed is an actual breed ( Cockapoos, Labradoodles, Schnoodles etc.)
- does not breed dogs of their breed to be bigger or smaller than the breed standard. ( IE does not use giant, king sized, bigger is better, teacup, peanut etc as a selling point.)
- does not use color as a selling point
- does not refer to any color that is not a common trait as "rare"( such as blue pit bulls, liver Dalmatians, blue Dobermans etc), especially if it is not an acceptable color for the breeds standard. ( For example: white Dobermans, Silver Labs, lemon Dalmatians, etc.)
- health tests all his dogs before breeding
- does not let a pet quality dog go unaltered
- only breeds titled dogs that have been proven to fit the breed standard to a T and will improve the breed due to having a sound body and temperment
- is [i]usually[/i] involved in rescue at some level be it fostering, financial, timewise, etc.
- thoroughly screens the homes his/her pups go to
- produces few dogs
- takes back the dogs of thier breeding(in explanation: If for any reason the purchaser of the dog cannot keep it due to illness, financial hardship or anything else that would cause someone to give up their dog, the breeder will take it back and rehome it themselves as opposed to the dog ending up in a shelter.)

- is there throughout the dogs life to answer questions and give advice to the owner.

Anyone have anything to add?

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[quote]does not breed dogs of their breed to be bigger than the breed standard. ( IE does not use giant, king sized, bigger is better as a selling point.)[/quote]

I would add smaller to this also. Lots of times small breeds are advertised to be extra small (teacup, peanut, etc...)

You could change it to: does not breed dogs of their breed to be bigger or smaller than the breed standard. ( IE does not use giant, king sized, bigger is better, teacup, tiny, super small) as a selling point.

[quote]is usually involved in rescue at some level [/quote]

I don't think it's necessary to be involved in rescue to be a good breeder. It would be nice but it doesn't have much to do with the puppies they are selling.

[quote]takes back the dogs of thier breeding
[/quote]

I would explain this more. It sounds like the breeder would not let someone keep a dog permanently. We know what it means, but someone else might not.

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[quote name='kendalyn'][quote]is usually involved in rescue at some level [/quote]

I don't think it's necessary to be involved in rescue to be a good breeder. It would be nice but it doesn't have much to do with the puppies they are selling.

[/quote]

Have to respectfully disagree there. I believe that any responsible breeder will truly care about the welfare of their breed in general, not necessarily just their own dogs or puppies produced. Therefore, I believe any responsible breeder will indeed be involved, to some degree or other, in breed rescue. :)

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[quote name='kendalyn']I would add smaller to this also. Lots of times small breeds are advertised to be extra small (teacup, peanut, etc...)

[/quote]

Excellent point, I'm so used to seeing stuff about the larger breeds that I totally spaced on the smaller ones. :oops:


I added some more stuff to my original post as well.

Does anybody else have any examples for "rare" or out of standard part? Or anything else for that matter?

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[quote name='kendalyn']

[quote]is usually involved in rescue at some level [/quote]

I don't think it's necessary to be involved in rescue to be a good breeder. It would be nice but it doesn't have much to do with the puppies they are selling.

[/quote]

I put usually in italics since it isn't ALWAYS the case.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Will have a contract outlining the care of their pup.

Talks to other breeders and fanciers, stays in touch with their breed.

In Canada they have to permanently identify their dog either through tattoo or microchip in order for it to be registered.

Will register their dog with a reputable breed or kennel club!

Is not afraid to ask questions or share information.

Is rarely too busy to address the concern of a puppy owner.

Will be more than proud to show off their achievements with their dogs in the dog world.

This is a good thread.

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Did I miss something about making sure all puppies are registered?

Also should there be population limits to keep breeders from capitalizing on "breeds of the week" i.e. the 101-Dalmations effect?

Maybe this would be too unenforceable or infringing on people's freedom but it really is a form of cruelty in my opinion, even if you are doing all of the right things otherwise.

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[quote]- only breeds titled dogs that have been proven to fit the breed standard to a T and will improve the breed due to having a sound body and temperment [/quote]

About titles- conformation titles shouldn't be enough (but should be included!), working titles (like herding for a border collie, tracking for a bloodhound, retrieving for a flattie) should be there too! Also, a sound temperament is not enough; if should be a sound temperament, yes, but also one that fits the breed standard. Which would make it very different for the different breeds. :wink:

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Star, I agree, and really don't see how anyone couldn't.

I've really gotten lost on the whole "responsible breeding" thing. I got my puppy from what sounded like a fairly responsible person, one or two things were a little odd, but every breeder I've ever met, or talked to, has had one or two things, if not more, that has made me feel a little un-easy.

Anyway, back to the being not sure part, it seems as if everyone has different views on whats reputable, and whats not. Like I said, a breeder I thought was a good one was called a byb by most everyone else. For reasons I saw only as just some minor faults.

I can't really tell the difference between responsible and not anymore, because all of the difference in opinions from everyone else, I don't know what to trust.

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  • 1 year later...

Hello pal, i think you will procure all details of responsible breeder online .I will tell you now bright future of [URL="http://dog-breeding-info.blogspot.com"]dog breeding[/URL]. Recent research about dog breeding resulted in birth of first cloned dog, snoppy.It makes sure that it is now possible to produce genetic twin of another dog though the method is expensive.

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[quote name='pomeranians']Star, I agree, and really don't see how anyone couldn't.

I've really gotten lost on the whole "responsible breeding" thing. I got my puppy from what sounded like a fairly responsible person, one or two things were a little odd, but every breeder I've ever met, or talked to, has had one or two things, if not more, that has made me feel a little un-easy.

Anyway, back to the being not sure part, it seems as if everyone has different views on whats reputable, and whats not. Like I said, a breeder I thought was a good one was called a byb by most everyone else. For reasons I saw only as just some minor faults.

I can't really tell the difference between responsible and not anymore, because all of the difference in opinions from everyone else, I don't know what to trust.[/quote]

You said what I was thinking exactly. On the other forum I'm a part of I was bashed because people claimed I supported puppy mills, and I thought I purchased my pup from a good place.

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[quote name='Queen Bitch']Many people who come here don't know what a responsible, good breeder is. I say say give them a list! Could we make this stickey?

A responsible breeder:
- does not perpetuate that a crossbreed is an actual breed ( Cockapoos, Labradoodles, Schnoodles etc.)
- does not breed dogs of their breed to be bigger or smaller than the breed standard. ( IE does not use giant, king sized, bigger is better, teacup, peanut etc as a selling point.)
- does not use color as a selling point
- does not refer to any color that is not a common trait as "rare"( such as blue pit bulls, liver Dalmatians, blue Dobermans etc), especially if it is not an acceptable color for the breeds standard. ( For example: white Dobermans, Silver Labs, lemon Dalmatians, etc.)
- health tests all his dogs before breeding
- does not let a pet quality dog go unaltered
- only breeds titled dogs that have been proven to fit the breed standard to a T and will improve the breed due to having a sound body and temperment
- is [I]usually[/I] involved in rescue at some level be it fostering, financial, timewise, etc.
- thoroughly screens the homes his/her pups go to
- produces few dogs
- takes back the dogs of thier breeding(in explanation: If for any reason the purchaser of the dog cannot keep it due to illness, financial hardship or anything else that would cause someone to give up their dog, the breeder will take it back and rehome it themselves as opposed to the dog ending up in a shelter.)

- is there throughout the dogs life to answer questions and give advice to the owner.

Anyone have anything to add?[/quote]

Hi their great article on pet breeding thats a hot list by the way I would add probiotics to the morning meal of every pets morning meal.:lol:

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  • 2 months later...

Wow, that's not an easy question to answer. Great breeders differ with the breeds that they're breeding.

And, if you're going with a breeder, go with a GREAT one, not just a "good enough" one. "Good enough" could cost you tons in vet bills.

Anyway, a great breeder will be honest with you. If you ask what types of health problems they can expect, they'll lay it all out and tell you what you can expect from THEIR lines.

Sometimes, even different lines of dogs have different health problems.

A great breeder will know everything about anything regarding their breed and will happily answer any question you ask. For example, if you were getting a golden retriever and asked how the breed came to be, a great breeder will tell you who bred to whom, what dogs were crossed and why, and how they started their kennel.

A great breeder will LOVE to talk to you all about your breed.

A great breeder will know what genetic problems to test for and will test for them in all of their breeding stock. In my breed, that means sub-luxation of the patellas, VWB (von willebrand's disease), PHPT (thyroid cancer), PRA (progressive retinal atrophy), alopecia X, and will have never bred a dog that has epilepsie.

A great breeder will title their dogs before breeding in some type of way. Either they will be performance tested, having sporting/herding/working/schutzhund titles or they will have conformation titles. Ideally, they'll have both.

A great breeder will make you sign a contract stating that you will spay/neuter the dog/bitch, that you will keep in contact with them, and that, if for any reason, you cannot keep the dog, that it will be transported back to them. Plus, they will guarentee the health of the dog for NO LESS THEN TWO YEARS.

I'm sorry, but a health contract for 72 hours is just stupid.

What all of this means for someone buying a pet is that their pet will be structurally sound and will live a long, active life and will LOOK like and ACT like the breed that it is supposed to be.

It will have tight feet and patellas so that it can romp and play and continue to be a sound animal until a ripe old age, etc. It will have a shorter back, so as to reduce and minimize back injuries. It's shoulders will have proper angulation to reduce wear and tear.

Its hips will not be disfigured with bad genetics, so that it will not be dysplastic as an adult.

It will have a solid temperment that is correct for whatever breed it is, so that you can trust the dog around strangers, other dogs, and children.

These are things that a normal puppy buyer won't know or even think about, but it makes all the difference in the life of your pet.

Not only that, but if you as a pet buyer have any questions about why your dog is doing this or that, or how to train them properly, or if you feel that something is not right with your dog, you will have a life time back up, friend, and resource.

THAT is a great breeder.

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  • 2 weeks later...

[quote name='Queen Bitch']Many people who come here don't know what a responsible, good breeder is. I say say give them a list! Could we make this stickey?

A responsible breeder:
- does not perpetuate that a crossbreed is an actual breed ( Cockapoos, Labradoodles, Schnoodles etc.)
- does not breed dogs of their breed to be bigger or smaller than the breed standard. ( IE does not use giant, king sized, bigger is better, teacup, peanut etc as a selling point.)
- does not use color as a selling point
- does not refer to any color that is not a common trait as "rare"( such as blue pit bulls, liver Dalmatians, blue Dobermans etc), especially if it is not an acceptable color for the breeds standard. ( For example: white Dobermans, Silver Labs, lemon Dalmatians, etc.)
- health tests all his dogs before breeding
- does not let a pet quality dog go unaltered
- only breeds titled dogs that have been proven to fit the breed standard to a T and will improve the breed due to having a sound body and temperment
- is [I]usually[/I] involved in rescue at some level be it fostering, financial, timewise, etc.
- thoroughly screens the homes his/her pups go to
- produces few dogs
- takes back the dogs of thier breeding(in explanation: If for any reason the purchaser of the dog cannot keep it due to illness, financial hardship or anything else that would cause someone to give up their dog, the breeder will take it back and rehome it themselves as opposed to the dog ending up in a shelter.)

- is there throughout the dogs life to answer questions and give advice to the owner.

Anyone have anything to add?[/quote]
each person is very unique " a dog breeder is constantly working harder to improve their training efforts and make it easier for themselves in the long run " using health techniques are one of the most valued conscience of breeding try feeding your pets a better type of [URL="http://www.healthfoodforpuppies.com"]premium pet food[/URL] :wink:

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