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Spayed/nuetered dogs get fat & lazy???


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This just struck me as being funny.
Today at the boarding kennel I had a lady drop off her very over weight female Rottweiler. The Rottie was waddling down the aisle not walking. Any way, she told me that she had discussed with the owner of the kennel that she is boarding her bitch as she has just come into heat and she doesnt want any "accidents" to happen. Myself, just making conversation asked...so, are you planning on breeding her ( I am also thinking she would need to loose a few pounds for a male to be even able to mount her properly :lol: ) the owner responds by saying...oh, no...we never planned on breeding her...we just didn't spay her as once they are spayed they get fat and lazy!!!
OK, now imagine how surprised I must have looked after she said this. I was surprised as I am looking at an intact bitch which is fatter than any Rottie I have ever seen before and the owner was afraid the dog would get fat and lazy if spayed:o I guess the owner took my surprised look as a look of wonderment and perhaps non understanding...so she then goes into detail about hormones and weight, thryoid etc. I didn't even respond, although I wanted to say some thing like, "heck, if thats the case then if your dog had been spayed you would need a flat bed on a tractor trailer just to transport her any where.
Any way, I know we have all discussed this topic to death. But, I think if owners understood that unspayed bitches can get just as fat as spayed bithes...it just depends on how much you feed the poor dog and how much exercise you give it and if the dog is predisposed to weight problems (just like us humans :wink: )

Any way, just thought I would share my hilarous day with every one. This really cracked me up.

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No dogpaddle, she did not get the irony. I really think she veiws her fat Rottie as possibly...big boned?? or perhaps very muscular. Although the the muscles on this particular dog were not rippling sleek muscles...they looked more like jello under a skim of fur :lol:
I truly think some people believe thier fat Rotties are muscular looking. Although every angle I tried to view this particular Rottie at it still came up looking...fat.

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[quote]Yikes! I'd tell her straight up her dog is grossly over weight and under exercised.[/quote]
MajiesMom,
Normally I would have discussed the weight issue with the owner...but in this case I deemed it pointless...as soon as I looked shocked when she started in on her sermon about spayed dogs getting fat and lazy...I knew she would not even hear any thing I had to say. I am going to leave that up to the owner of the kennel :evilbat:
When the owner of the kennel sees this dog...well, lets just say this dogs owner will be leaving feeling very ashamed of herself.
The owner of the kennel I work at is a very good talker. When she talks people listen...when I talk, people tend to drift off :lol: So there fore my boss is straight foreward and to the point and makes her self understood. Myself on the other hand when it comes to face to face confrontations I act like a shy mouse and I start to stutter when I think I may be saying some thing the person doesnt want to hear. :lol: :wink: its a good thing I work in the back ground for the most part. :lol:

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I agree, but now for Devil's Advocate....

In this woman's case the dog was not just fat, but dangerously obese.
Obviously obese. But most people (including myself til a few years ago) dont honestly realize when their dog is overweight. Free is a little overweight, although not obese, and I didnt realize it til a few years ago when the vet put a "proper vs. improper" weight chart up on the wall. with pictures. The pictures made the whole difference. Looking at that, I honestly would have said that a dog who's ribs showed a little when they
turned, and who's waist was tucked in that tightly, was underweight!!
:oops: :oops: :oops: (I still always think "starved" when I see a healthy greyhound or whippet, even though I know better). Free has lost 4 of the 6
lbs of extra padding, and while not perfect, looks much better to the vet.
I think she looks ok, and I think Laurel is too thin looking at her, but Doc disagrees and I'll go with that. I wouldnt have had I not seen that chart with pictures.

Free did gain weight after being spayed, cuz I never cut down her food
portions. Simple as that. Some of them dont need as much food after
fixing, their metabolisms slow down, or they need a little more exercise.
So yes, they can get "fat" after spaying, but not because of the spaying itself. My current vet (the lady doc, who I just love!) didnt spay Free.
The head doctor of the clinic did, and he never once mentioned that she might need to eat less, or get more exercise. How often do the vets you know actually point that out? The lady doc did when I brought Laurel in, after telling her she had just ben spayed, she said "watch her diet, she's just right now but could gain weight easily." I said she looked a little thin, and she gave me that "look" (she can whither people with a look, and she's just a tiny thing) and said, as if she was reading my mind "she's a hound. her ribs are supposed to stick out a little like that when she turns"
I asked how she knew I was thinking that, and she said "most people see ribs and think 'starving'. Not true in a dog."

I just wonder, since the first doc said nothing about weight, how many people actually get educated about a dogs weight after neutering?

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