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Stubborn chow chow

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Guest Anonymous
I have a female chows that's a little over a year old, and she's stubborn as heck. Sometimes I lose my patience with her, and my voice gets pretty loud. I never, EVER discipline her or reprimand her physically. I've had her to puppy class, and did the training exercises with her outside of class. Any tips or suggestions on how to handle her stubbornness or the lack of my patience? Thanks!

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Chows are STUBBORN by nature. I think it will be much easier on you if you convince her that it's fun and in HER best interest to go along with you. Not that she always will anyway, she's a chow! :D
Here is a quote from the site [url]http://www.chow-chow-dogs.com/[/url]
"The Chow Chow is usually well mannered, but can be willful and protective. Common traits include being bossy, serious and very independent. They can be self-willed to the point of obstinacy. Often a one-person dog, they are very loyal to their family, even though he may act reserved, even with their family. They may become aggressive if strangers push themselves on this dog. A dominant owner is required for this domineering breed. If a handler is a calm person who is naturally fair and firm, the Chow Chow can develop well. However, do not expect great obedience from Chow Chows. They are born stubborn and with minds of their own. These dogs are certainly not stupid and they can learn, but they must see the point of your command. It is important to be consistent at all times. Some experts claim the shorthaired Chow is more active and learns faster than the longhaired. "

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Guest Anonymous
So you have a Chow too eh? We have a (just turned) one year old MALE chow. He surprises us daily - believe me!!!! However, I am amazed with the intellligence of the breed and absolutely enamored with their pleading look....BUT thats where they get ya! lol :roll:

I have had trouble with Jazper since he was a pup. First with his constant crying through the night and now with his constant barking and although he knows many commands for his age, he tries to always be the one to decide when to obey them. He thinks he's the boss, you know! I find he is unfocused - if others are around, I have a hard time getting him to obey a simple command, but if we are alone he pays much more attention and is generally pleasant.

I have been fortunate with him temperment-wise. He has a wonderful temperment and loves children and especially other animals (even if they don't like him) - contrary to what a lot of breeders say about the breed. I canot imagine our dog ever being anything but the loving animal he is today.

Lately I have been working with him extensively (about 4-5 hours a day). We were told to pretty much give him his first year of life off...and then start with training. This is pretty much what we have done. Some hints....chows are food oriented. I have found - just in the last few days that using his food as incentive is working fabulously! (On suggestion of a breeder) If you want to know how to do this, e-mail me. As well, make sure your dog views you as the alpha-male. They are a dominent breed and the only way to get a head up is to teach them that you are MORE dominent and they MUST follow YOU - not the other way around. I used a tethering technique over the last week and oh my what a difference. Its like I own a different dog. For the first time in a long time, when he is off his lead he comes when he is called. And if you knew this dog, you would know what a feat that is!!!
Good luck with your dog - and dont give up on him - its hard work to own a Chow - but the rewards are everlasting!
EBBY

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Chows are VERY willful and stubborn. I had a female who just didn't get the picture (that [b]I[/b] was alpha, not her) until I grabbed her one day by the scruff and flipped her over and growled in her face. :oops: I know that is not the recommended way to deal with one but she had snapped in my face. She never did it again!!!!

She turned out to be a lovely dog. She was loving and friendly to everyone. Her name was Sugar Bear.

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[quote name='EBBY']
Lately I have been working with him extensively (about 4-5 hours a day). We were told to pretty much give him his first year of life off...and then start with training. This is pretty much what we have done. EBBY[/quote]

Ok, I gotta say this first. I'm not a trainer and all that. Just a podunk pet owner. However...

This is the first time I've ever seen where it was recommended to wait until a dog is at least a year old to begin training. It just seems odd. Especially a strong willed and typically stubborn breed. Anybody else ever heard of this? It just seems like a bad idea (from a podunk pet owner point of view, of course).

I'm seriously not being sarcastic, or questioning your credibility. I genuinely wonder if waiting until any dog, but especially a breed notorious for being stubborn and strong willed, is a year old to begin training is such a good idea.

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Guest Anonymous
[quote name='Horsefeathers!']
Ok, I gotta say this first. I'm not a trainer and all that. Just a podunk pet owner. However...

This is the first time I've ever seen where it was recommended to wait until a dog is at least a year old to begin training. It just seems odd. Especially a strong willed and typically stubborn breed. Anybody else ever heard of this? It just seems like a bad idea (from a podunk pet owner point of view, of course).

I'm seriously not being sarcastic, or questioning your credibility. I genuinely wonder if waiting until any dog, but especially a breed notorious for being stubborn and strong willed, is a year old to begin training is such a good idea.[/quote]

I wasnt sure about it either to tell you the truth. Dont misunderstand - he got some general training. Such as sit and lay and housebreaking - simple general stuff that he didnt quite grasp anyways.... anything more complex we were told to wait a year because he was soooooo unfocused as a puppy that it seemed to be a waste of time. He couldnt concentrate long enough to get the picture and we were wasting our time and money on obedience schools. I thought it odd....and worked with him a bit anyways, but I have to say - in the last little while - now that he is a year - working with him has been a real pleasure. He is still unfocused somewhat, but he is definately more focused than he was nine months ago when we tried to start training him. And I am proud now to say he is my dog - because he has proven his intelligence and his capabilities that I had a hard ime convincing anyone was there. Including and especally my husband who had almost given up on him and was very close to looking for another home for him. (Especially after he got out of his kennel one day while we were out and in a matter of two hours ate through the front door [the bottom corner of it] so that we could see outside after that without having to even open it. He ate the corners off the pine coffee table, ate my leather coat to shreds and all the feet off my daughters barbie dolls that she had left ont he floor of her room.) We are raising Satan, but I have to say waiting that year as painful as it was gave him a chance to be just a puppy and the rewards now are amazing. Please dont htink I am saying every Chow owner should do this however, every dog is different outside of their breed. You have to find what works for you....just so happens THIS worked for us.

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Guest Anonymous
[quote name='MalloMar']I have a female chows that's a little over a year old, and she's stubborn as heck. Sometimes I lose my patience with her, and my voice gets pretty loud. I never, EVER discipline her or reprimand her physically. I've had her to puppy class, and did the training exercises with her outside of class. Any tips or suggestions on how to handle her stubbornness or the lack of my patience? Thanks![/quote]

I suggest you use rewards/ incentives everytime your chowchow follows your command. However, you should really take note of the right timing. For instance, you instructed your chow to sit, as soon as his butt touches the ground, praise him lavishly. Try to end the training sessions in a high note so as to engrave in his mind that training is fun. Patience is the key my dear! :fadein:

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:o Whoa !!! Thanks for pointing that out K !!! Here I read through the whole thing and never even noticed the dates until I got to your reply !!! :oops: :oops: I think I'm in the twilight zone......... :drinking: :lol:

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Guest Anonymous
Well I enjoyed reading it either way. :) I too had a Chow Chow who lived to 15 wonderful years. Zeus was stubborn the whole time even though he knew I was the boss. I waited 2 years before getting another dog...I wanted a little dog who would do what I wanted to do this time. I got a Yorkie. SHE makes Zeus seem like an obedience champion. LOL We are still working on basic things like "come" every single day.

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:roll: Chow Chow breeder in Romania:hi, there and happy winter celebrations!
[URL="http://www.freewebs.com/monasim"]www.freewebs.com/monasim[/URL]

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