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Rottweiler or Doberman Pinscher

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Guest Anonymous
I'm thinking about getting a dog, and I can't settle on one breed. I've gotten it narrowed down to the Rottweiler or Doberman Pinscher. I have never owned a dog before but have had many expirences with larger and stereotyped dogs. I have helped train a Pit Bull Mix before, and other dogs. I've read many many articles on each dog about their Temperament, Trainability, Apearence, and Good Training Methods for each breed. But unfortunatly I don't know anyone who owns either of them. I have a medium to large yard that is fenced all the way around, and is in good repair. I'll have plenty of time to train and play with the dog, and to give it exersice. Their will be five people in the house and I the youngest of 13 will be taking care of it and training it. Of coarse the rest of the family will interact with it, so I'll socalize it well. Well heres all my information I think you'll need on me so to those who own one of the two breeds what are the pro's and con's of the breed.

Thankyou

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First off, WELCOME CYBERMAXX!! :D

You sound like someone who has certainly done their homework!! :wink:


I suggest you stick around, we have NancyB a Dobe owner, and loads of Rottie owners! :wink:

Personally, I'm not an expert on either breeds... altho I LOVE the Dobe! :wink:

Hope you stick around, because there are loads of people here who will be able to help you! :wink:

-Rowie-the-Pooh

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Well if you want my opinion I say ROTTIE all the way. ( Only because I own 3. ) I also had a Dobbie when I was a little girl. :D
Rotties weight can be from 85-130lbs and Dobbies 60-85lbs. Both are gaurdians. I just love the thickness of the Rottie. Dobbies are tallers I believe. I also like the muscle look of the Rottie. My babies are very loyal but the same goes for the Dobbie. I could go on and on about both.... likes and dislikes.
I pasted below some reading material for you........ Good luck in your decision...
Temperament of a Rottweiler..
The Rottweiler is basically a calm, confident and courageous dog with a self-assured aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships. A Rottweiler is self-confident and responds quietly and with a wait-and-see attitude to influences in his environment. He has an inherent desire to protect home and family, and is an intelligent dog of extreme hardness and adaptability with a strong willingness to work, making him especially suited as a companion, guardian and general all-purpose dog.

The behavior of the Rottweiler in the show ring should be controlled, willing and adaptable, trained to submit to examination of mouth, testicles, etc. An aloof or reserved dog should not be penalized, as this reflects the accepted character of the breed. An aggressive or belligerent attitude towards other dogs should not be faulted.

A judge shall excuse from the ring any shy Rottweiler. A dog shall be judged fundamentally shy if, refusing to stand for examination, it shrinks away from the judge. A dog that in the opinion of the judge menaces or threatens him/her, or exhibits any sign that it may not be safely approached or examined by the judge in the normal manner, shall be excused from the ring. A dog that in the opinion of the judge attacks any person in the ring shall be disqualified.

Temperament of a Doberman....
Energetic, watchful, determined, alert, fearless, loyal and obedient. The judge shall dismiss from the ring any shy or vicious Doberman.

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Guest Anonymous
Thanks for the info. :D I'm also having trouble deciding which look i like better the sleed and gracefull look of the doberman pinscher or the (as you said). Or the musculer and confident look of the rottwiler. In the doberman pinscher I'm worried about its sharpness, even though it's become less "super alert" we do have quite a few dogs around where I live. I'm basicly worried about the same thing with rottweilers, if it'll do fine with other dogs. Xavierandrea how do your rottweilers do with other dogs?

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Well my dogs are very dominant. I have 2 alphas and that is a struggle in itself.... The other one will follow in the footsteps of the 2. If another dog approaches them that is an alpha mine will bark and growl and do everything to scare the dog away. But if another dogs approaches them that is not an alpha they will get along fine. My mother owns a Shih Tzu and my tenant owns a Pitt. My Rotties gets along very good with them. You have to socialize your dogs at a very young age. I strongly believe in that. The more contact with other dogs the more your dogs will be use to others. :)

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I personally prefer Rotties. The ones that I have known are somewhat less aloof than Dobies. I do love Dobies, but they seem to bond very strongly with one person, whereas I feel that Dobies are more family-oriented.

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Guest Anonymous
How long can rottweiler puppies stay home alone? Because their will be no one home during school hours. If they can't stay alone that long (and if I get a rottweiler) I will have to consider getting a young rottie instead of a puppy.

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Guest Anonymous
Puppies can stay home alone one hour more then months old they are. 3 months= 4hours, ect.

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:lol: Well it depends on if you are using a crate. When our dogs were younger we always used the crate. The longest we had them in the crate would be 4 - 5 hours during the day and from 11p to about 6a or 7a. My boyfriend worked the 2nd shift and i worked 1st shift so that helped out alot. I do not believe in crating for a long time like 8 or more hours. That would be too much for a dog. My 1st was a female she took a long time to become housebroken, ( 8 months ). My 2nd was a female we adopted at the age of 3 so we didn't have to go through puppy training. My 3rd is a male. He is the smartest of them all. He was completly housebroken in 3 months. Once our dogs were house broken we didn't use the crates any more and let them roam the home. We still have their crates out because sometimes they will go inside to get away from the others......I could go on for hours about them...
:ices_blah:

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[quote name='Cybermaxx12']In the doberman pinscher I'm worried about its sharpness, even though it's become less "super alert" we do have quite a few dogs around where I live. I'm basicly worried about the same thing with rottweilers, if it'll do fine with other dogs. Xavierandrea how do your rottweilers do with other dogs?[/quote]

Both Dobes and Rotties are protective breeds and as such, require quite a bit more work than "an average dog". A protective breed of dog entails a larger responsibility both to the dog and to members of the public. Obedience classes are a must and heavy socialization from puppyhood on is very important.

I like both Rotties and Dobes although, naturally, I favor Dobes since that's what I have. :D With both breeds it is imparitive that the owner be firm but loving with them. If you don't run the show, they will and not only will you not like it but, it could be downright dangerous.

If you consider either breed you should check with your homeowners insurance company first to be sure that the won't drop your coverage. Yes, it's not fair but it is happening with alarming frequency.

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i'm not an expert on either breed although i very much admire both, but you should also look into what kind of health problems go with each breed. i know a lot of thicker more massively built dogs (like rotties) have many more joint problems that more lightly built dogs (like dobies), just be sure you know what kind of problems to expect and what the pros and cons are of each breed.

my brother has a red dobie, she spent her first year just with him, she met lots of people and went out with him all the time but she is very very much a one person dog. she tolerates other people, but she is very aloof with everyone but he and his new wife-who she also loves but not anywhere near as much as my brother.

also you should look into the issue of ear clipping and decide what you would do about that if you got a dobie. i know some breeders have it all taken care of ahead of time but my brother had to take care of the whole process himself, including taking her to a vet for the procedure and keeping her ears bandaged and taped while they were healing.

this is just my two cents, keep us updated and let us know what you decide :) good luck to you :)

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Hi Cyber! welcome!

let me help you if I can. Before you decide on EITHER of these dogs, please do some research into the alpha position in the household, for both
training and safety.

Dobies and Rotties (I personally prefer Rotties) are guarding dogs, which genetically means they are very dominant and need a STRONG hand
in raising and training them. If you will be the dogs primary caretaker, there are some things you need to know during training.

These dogs can become VERY alpha in a short time if you do not make yourself the alpha from the get-go. Alpha means YOU RUN THE SHOW.
The dog has to obey you, every command, every time. Some more tips:

Do NOT let this dog sleep on your bed until it has accepted you as alpha.
(or anyone elses bed for that matter, or the couches)

Do NOT let this dog eat before you do, even if that means you have to sit down and eat some crackers while he/she watches. YOU eat first, always.

Do NOT let this dog go thru doorways before you. Make him wait until you are thru. This is what the pack lead would expect.

If you have stairs in your house, do NOT let this dog lay down at the
top of the stairs and look down on you. That is the alpha's position.

And you are reading this and saying to yourself "This woman is a nutcase - why would I need to treat a puppy this way?"

Because if either of these dogs is allowed to be alpha, yourself and your family members could be in jeapordy. There is a LOT of work required to raise a guardian breed dog. The dogs who are not "put in their place" are
the ones you hear about on the news; the ones who were not trained and socialized properly, and bit someone because of it. Please dont make that mistake. I have 30 years of dog training experience behind me. If you need help, let me know.

and Welcome to Dogo!!!

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I would definatly go the dobe!!! :D
I've always loved the breed, their sleek coat and their ever sharp, intellegent look. You can also get a very different coulours, all very nice, I like the blueish ones personally :wink:
As with any breed, go to shows, talk to some breeders and when you decide on getting a pup check out both parents as well as any other family members (when I got Lily I got to see her grandparents and Auntis and all :) )
I know that a dobe may not be a great 'first breed' but it sounds like you've done your research and are prepared for whatever is thrown at you.
Good luck in finding the perfect puppy :angel:

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Guest Anonymous
You wouldnt believe how many purebred Rotties and Dobies are in rescues. I'd suggest contacting your local breed rescue groups for both breeds and discussing with them the pros and cons of the breed. Most breed rescues are MORE than happy to answer all your questions. You could probably arrange to meet some of thier dogs as well.

Give serious consideration to adopting a young adult from rescue as well. You'd be able to choose a dog with a temperament that suits your home, as opposed to a pup whose temperament may or may not meld with your familys'.

If you need help finding a rescue, feel free to ask! I can usually dig up the contacts for most rescues in the US:)

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What Courtnek and Mei-Mei said are all true. We had to be very carefull with our dogs. When the 2 we bought were puppies they would try to race us to the kitchen or outside. This would be very frustrating. " Who can get to the door quicker? " In the dogs mind it would be them right? OH NO! We would turn around and go the other way. The dogs would be all confused. We also use the Sit and Stay command, then go to where we need to go then call them to us. There is alot of training that needs to be done. As I stated I have 2 Alphas and those 2 are still trying to race me to the doors. But I always wins. LOL. You must and I stress must have a strong hand when dealing with the Rottie or Dobbie. Rotties are stuborn. They are also very strong. My" Free " dragged me across the yard once. :oops: She even has Hip Dysplasia & arthritis. ( You couldn't it tell that day. ) I wasn't paying attention and the next thing I felt was a tug and away I went..... I laugh about it now, but I learned the hard way to keep my eyes on them at all times. A good trainer will help you.

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Guest Anonymous
Thanks again for the information, It's great that I the breed owners will talk to me. Mei-Mei I actully did'nt start out with wanting to get a Doberman Pinscher or a Rottweiler. I first loved German Shepherds. But then I decided to look into Shelties. But Shelties are smaller and they have that famous sheepdog can run all day type of energy. Plus the smaller dog type of energy. So I looked into the more calmer Collie, but that did'nt have the brains as a Sheltie. So then I looked into a Border Colie. Which according to a ranking I found is "Typically" the smartest, so I was thinking it's a smart good looking dog among other things. But then I read about how Border Collies can get board if left alone for a while and since I'm gone at school all day it most likely would. And Border Collies are known to open doors and jump fences and then come back before the owner returns. So then I thought Rottweiler, and Belgian Tervuren. And while Belgian Tervuren is still my favorite type they would rather have an adult owner. So I said Rottweiler, but then I started wanting the Doberman Pinscher. And so I did research on both and still couldnt decide on these to great dogs. So then I came here. And about the breeder I have found a respectable breeder of Rottweilers in my area (I live in SC) but not Doberman Pinschers, though I'm still working on that. ImpyOop I did'nt know that but your right, I'll really consider that as an option. I have local shelters with both Rottweilers and Doberman Pinschers. Thankyou everybody.

If you do live in the SC area and have a Rottweiler or Doberman Pinscher and it was very well bred could you tell me where you got your dog? Please.

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Guest Anonymous
As a person who has had both breeds. Ask your self i you want a male or female too. Because i had a female dobie and a male rottie. My dobie was so attached, its no wonder they call them velcro-dogs. Dobies are a lot easier to train, where Rotties can be a little stubborn. Both do great with positive training, negative corrections are not suggested as they are both really sensative dogs and just the thought that they are making you happy is really the best thing for them.
Bri was a great dog not to big not to small, one thing if you get a Dobie..; it is going to want to get on the couch and it is going to want to sleep in the bed. we tried to stop Bri for a while and then just gave up because of her persistance. I actually grew really, really attached to her and even now i miss her like crazy.
Both breeds are guardian breeds this much is true. SOCIALIZATION.... this cannot be stressed enough and nt just the family and other dogs. when you are out walking and if people are passing let them pet your puppy, tons of good interactions and praise. Both breeds need a job too. they can get bored and destructive although a Rottie can do CONSIDERABLE damage, a determined dobie is nothing to scoff at.
You have got to let us know what you decide.

and a pic for those that are waiting...
Here are the two of them right after i got Daz. the Dobies name is Brianna
[img]http://members.fortunecity.com/moloss/rw/am/o5.jpg[/img]

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i have to second what RNP said, my brothers dog is extremely well trained and he had a very easy time training her. also, i have a dobie mix and she and my bros dog ALWAYS want to be in your lap or leaning on your leg or lying behind you while your working on anything, they will become your shadow. i personally love it but it might get on some peoples nerves........

RNP your dogs are gorgous, i love black and tan dobies.........

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I'm going to answer/ comment on a bunch of different posts in this post.

Dobes are very intelligent and highly trainable but, they do like to put their own "twist" on things...they're creative. For an experienced trainer or someone who is both with the dog and to learn what they need to know to train, they can be an absolute joy. They can learn new behaviors very fast!

With Dobes it's very important to either buy from a responsible breeder or adopt a Dobe from Dobe rescue. (Dobe rescue has very experienced folks who carefully evaluate each dog prior to placement.) Dobe temperament can vary a LOT! A responsible breeder will consider the temperament, structure, health testing, longevity and drive levels of the sire/dam they breed. A BYBer wil not do that and can turn out Dobes that have unbalanced drives or lack of stability that, coupled with the Dobes natural protectiveness, can be dangerous.

All responsible breeders in the US crop ears prior to placement. That's just the way it is folks. Breeders do their utmost to ensure that the homes their pups are placed in are lifetime homes. They have contracts that stipulate that if the dog must be given up for any reason, it must come back to them. It is darn near impossible to enforce those contracts. To ensure that if the worst should happen to a pup they produce (pup looses it's home and winds up in rescue) they crop ears. Dobe rescue's stats prove that uncropped Dobes in the US are much more difficult to place than cropped ones.

The second reason the breeders crop prior to placement is that correct cropping is an art. Not every vet is skilled at doing it. It's a terrible thing to see a lovely Dobe with a crop that would look better on a Pit Bull! Breeders also want the cut edges of the ears to be entirely healed prior to placement. (No, the ears won't be standing...posting will go on for months but, the raw edges need to be cared for by an experienced person.) The breeders are the experinced ones who will know which vets to use and which to stay away from.

The third reason that breeders crop prior to placement is that Dobes are typically cropped at from 7 weeks to 9 week...and 9 weeks is pushing it a bit late. The breeders may not have made a final decision on which pup from the litter will be the one they will be keeping or which ones will be placed in show homes. There has only ever been one natural eared Dobe who finished a championship in the US. Natural ears are a fault that is heavily penalized in the conformation ring.

Now, you may say "I don't want to show so I don't need to buy from a show breeder". That may be true but, the show breeders are the ones who are doing all the health testing, considering longevity, breeding for correct structure and longevity and taking the temperament into consderation. That, of course, does not guarantee that the pup you get will be heathy, have balanced drives and no structural problems but, it has a heck of a lot better chance than a pup produced with little or not consideration to those things. Every single "show" litter will also produce pet quality pups. While they're not inexpensive (Dobes are a pricey breed) they sell for considerably less than a show potential pup.

Health. Generally speaking hips are not a problem in well bred Dobes. That is not to say that it never happens but, the responsible breeders have been very good about screening hips through OFA prior to breeding and not breeding dogs with bad or marginal hips. A responsible breeder will have VWD DVA tests done on the sire/dam prior to breeding. (An extremely simplified explanation of VWD...think human hemophelia.) A full thyroid pannel should be done prior to breeding. Eyes of sire and dam should be CERFed. A cardiac ultrasound or holter montier should be done as well.

The two biggest killers of Dobes are cancer and cardio. There is no DNA or other test that will define with any precision prior to death if a Dobe is predisposed to either. Research is carrying on but, right now the best breeders can do is breed to dogs that have a lot of longevity in their pedigrees and hope to avoid the two. REsponsible breeders do the Cardio testing that I mentioned above but, unfortunately, a dog can pass the test and then drop dead of DCM a short time later. All the test does is insure that a breeder does not breed a dog that is already displaying symptoms of DCM.

If you have not reviewed the information on the Doberman Pinscher Club of America's website, I would recommend that you do so. At the bottom of the home page of my kid's website (below in my signature), you'll find links to the DPCA's home page, DPCA's breeder's education page. You will also find an explanation of genetic diseases that impact the Dobe on the DPCA's website.

Gotta run!

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Guest Anonymous
Thanks everybody with all your help. And I have decided what breed I want. I don't think I'm ready to handle a Rottweiler. So I'm going with the Doberman Pinscher :D Once again thank you everybody for your info and advise. I'll most likely get one next summer or get a 8 months to 1 year sometime before then(Hopefully). When (if) I get my dog I post with pictures. :D

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Great choice cyber!!! Thats the one I would have gone with, just remember, big dogs can be very expensive to maintain. I'm always broke with my two, and they aren't even as big as a dobe! Worth every cent though, of course :wink:
You should join, like I always say, when it comes to dogs, you can never learn too much! You can never brag too much either, but thats a different matter all together :roll:
Yes, do make sure you post pics as soon as you get your new bundle of joy, we all love puppys! :angel:

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A rottweiler in America tends to be a level below a Doberman in so many ways. I could go on foreever, but I'll simply say this.

The Doberman is a hybrid canine that was made in Germany in the 1880s. No Dobermans were really in the U.S. in any sort of population until after WWI and WWII when the soldiers brought took them home in the first and by the second many Dobermans had become war dogs. There is a war monument to their valor even.

Despite their success in so many fields in both the U.S. and Germany the Americans have seemed to lost their love for the best dog ever! Not in Germany though! Fire dogs actually go in burning buildings and pull humans out even killing themselves in the process. I saw a video once, horiible, this Doberman dragged a man from a burning skyscraper in Germany and then died right when his job was done. Maybe the Germans can just train them better and most people are just afraid to use them in work such as police, fire, and other dog work.

But alas! The Doberman to find the deepest and last bodies of the World Trade Center site was a hundred and five pound female Dobie! I have seen Dobermans stilled used in U.S. police work. And just last summer I met a woman who lives in downtown Chicago who has a brilliant Doberman for her live-in helper dog! I took pictures of her!

Anyway, agility, stamina, intelligence, beauty, all the Doberman has the upperhand on the Rott. Though the Rott did help much in the creation of the Doberman, other more intelligent dogs were used in the mixing.

So enjoy your Doberman as I do mine!

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well they are both great breeds but for different reasons so the first question you have to ask yourself is what are you looking for in a dog? Decide first what you want in a dog and then research both breeds and decide which fits your lifestyle better
both will need adequate excersise but comparitvely speaking a dobe will need more.
Both are large breed dogs, dobes are a lot taller than rotties but rotties are heavier so what are your preferences in terms of size. Both breeds are make excellent guard dogs but also keep in mind that both breeds need a strong consistant pack leader personality from everyone living in the house. it is great to say that you will be the main person training it, however everyone living in the home has to be on board with training and socializing the dog to know its proper place in the family hierarchy. No dog breed should be the alpha dog in the household however when dealing with powerful breeds like these two you will get yourself in some trouble if you are not able to be an assertive strong pack leader. My best advice is to first find out what you are looking for in a dog and what you can REALISTICALLY offer that dog and then see which dog is best suited to your lifestyle and home situation.

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