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my new american bulldog puppy is crazy please help me


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Guest Anonymous

i just got a new american bulldog puppy. he is 17 weeks old and is insane. he tries to bite me from time to time if he doesent like what im telling him not to do. he pees on the carpet when hes mad. and he doesnt listen!! if anyone can help me or has any advice for me please e mail me at [email][email protected][/email]. Thank you

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I dont think he's peeing on the floor because he's mad with you - he's only 17 weeks old, that's what puppies do until they're housetrained! :lol: His bladder isn't big enough to hold on very long at that age, give it a few more weeks at least.
I'm sure someone here will be able to offer some advice, best of luck.
Lisa
xx

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Did you even RESEARCH dog owning and your breed before purchasing the puppy? :-? Did you even RESEARCH the American Bulldog, which is NOT for first time owners? NEVER have I heard of a puppy getting MAD at it's owner and peeing on the carpet........ :-? Sorry, but it seems like you didn't do your research! :x

Please do some research, the internet has ALOT of resources, and so do books! It would be a shame if your pup turned out aggressive or something like that and you have it put down because YOU couldn't do the research.... :cry: :-?

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Here is a great page for you will all kinds of topics on raising a puppy, there are about 3 pages and some titles will not apply to you....
Good luck with your pup, and remember success builds confidence...only punish your pup if you catch him in the act...once the dirty deed is done he won't know what your upset about.... :lol: Your pup is not peeing on the carpet because he is mad...he just doesnt know what is expected of him...he sounds confused...read the articles I have attached and there is an article on page 2 I beleive explaining puppy biting, and house training

[b][color=red]GOOD LUCK, AND HAVE FUN![/color][/b]
:lol: :lol:
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/search_action.cfm?cls=0[/url]

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I don't know if the web page I requested went through... :o
here are individual pages for your review....once again have fun with your new furbaby! :lol:

[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?articleid=154[/url]
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1551&articleid=164[/url]
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1549&articleid=172[/url]
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1549&articleid=173[/url]
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1548&articleid=157[/url]
[url]http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&cat=1551&articleid=163[/url]

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[quote name='Rowie-the-Pooh'] Did you even RESEARCH the American Bulldog, which is NOT for first time owners? NEVER have I heard of a puppy getting MAD at it's owner and peeing on the carpet........ :-? [/quote]

I just wanna say that "NOT for first time owners" doesn't mean much, unless you're looking for a dog that's easy to deal with, in which case you're pretty much left with Goldens and Labs (don't have anything against these breeds, I'm just saying that they are very very popular with first time owners). Now, on the other hand there are many breeds out there which anyone can own, but they're more troublesome--you need to do more research, spend time training and socializing them, be firm with them... But there is nothing wrong with a first time owner (well, sort of) owning a Pei, let's say :wink:

And the getting mad part, although I don't think it applies to puppies, I have heard it about mature dogs--who are upset when left alone (even for half an hour) and would go pee on the owner's bed/couch/carpet :o

And one more thing... wildturkey's post sort of made me smile because that's how we felt about Hippo when we got her--especially after the first few days, when the pup got used to the house and everything, it's soooooo much work. Not to say it's not fun, but it's a lot of work, you sorta have to put everything else in your life on hold for weeks! But I can say that if you try to solve each one of teh proplems you're having (resaerch each one of them) and then also excercise your dog (somebody on this forum said "a tired dog is a good dog" and I couldn't agree more), the puppy becomes less of a handful... and you can then stop thinking about sending messages in abottle to teh outside world :evilbat:

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I have never heard of a dog being "mad" and peeing somewhere, whether pup or adult.
There is seperation anxiety, which is exactly what it sounds like, they are anxious as they have been left and they do not understand that their owner will be home again. It's not anger though.
Anyway, back to this pup, it just needs time, patience and showing where to go. Punishment wont help, verbal or otherwise, as the pup wont understand and you'll only make them scared of you.
Let your pup out into the garden or designated peeing place often, then as the weeks go by progress to leaving them longer in between pee breaks.
Paper training does work for some, but usually it's just confusing for the dog, as first you tell it to mess on the paper, then outside, and it takes a lot longer. Start as you mean to go along. :D

(Ps. I dont think labs/retrievers are great pets for first time owners either, personally, they need lots of time, training, exercise and stimulation, almost as much as a collie, although they are lovely dogs!)

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[quote name='LisaLQ']
(Ps. I dont think labs/retrievers are great pets for first time owners either, personally, they need lots of time, training, exercise and stimulation, almost as much as a collie, although they are lovely dogs!)[/quote]
Sorry, what I meant is that any breed can be a great dog for first time owners--if they're willing to put in the time to research and train their dogs--but that only labs and goldens are immediately recommended by dog books as good for first time owners, mellow, good with kids and other pets, etc. Now, I don't believe in this kind of generalizations, but they are made all the same...

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[quote]I have never heard of a dog being "mad" and peeing somewhere, whether pup or adult.
There is seperation anxiety, which is exactly what it sounds like, they are anxious as they have been left and they do not understand that their owner will be home again. It's not anger though. [/quote]
[b]Quote by LisaLQ[/b]

I also have never heard of a dog being "mad" and peeing somewhere in the house...dog's do not have minds like us humans and do not inflict revenge as we do...if so, can you imagine what the wild animals would be doing to us for ruining their environment! :o
As Lisa explained seperation anxiety is the number one cause of falling off the house training lessons...and some times dogs develop bladder infections and cannot hold their bladder for long periods...or perhaps the dog did not get a chance to do "all" it's business before the owners left it alone...there are plenty of medical reasons for a dog to "forget" its house training...and some times behavior problems...or some times it can be a confused dog which has been harshly treated during house training which is confused and doesnt know what is right and what is wrong...people scolding a pup or dog for going indoors after the fact...once the pup or dog has done it's business...its thinking about now...not then...by scolding the pup/dog after its made a mistake it thinks its being scolded for perhaps looking at you...what ever it is doing at that moment...

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[quote name='Cassie']
I also have never heard of a dog being "mad" and peeing somewhere in the house...dog's do not have minds like us humans and do not inflict revenge as we do...if so, can you imagine what the wild animals would be doing to us for ruining their environment! :o [/quote]
Ok, point proven. I agree with you now :D

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Guest Anonymous

Get the book called Good owners, Great dogs. It has lots of helpful ideas and is great for first time owners when they need help :lol: Good luck with your dog! Carolina Dogs are also great for first time owners. :D

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I would also suggest a book by John Fisher called "Why Does My Dog...?"

there is a lot of good information on housebreaking, socializing, and also explains the "who's Boss" concept of rank in a human/animal household,
which you may find very useful with a Bully breed. They need a strong hand, discipline and training to become the kind of pet you want to have.

Do not mistake "strong hand" for punishment, please. This breed can be
stubborn, and you will need to train the puppy to obey you no matter what. Once that is accomplished, I think you'll find he is a wonderful friend and companion.

at 17 weeks he should be very close to completely housetrained, so since he isnt behaving properly you may want to consider taking him to a professional puppy trainer to work out the bugs...

Good Luck!! :D

and ps. as well....

Labs and Goldens are advertised as the "perfect first time dog" in just
about every dog related magazine there is. Their breed standard says "they are intelligent, friendly, good with kids, easily trained", etc...

FOR THE MOST PART - that is basically true. However, the ad's make people think that because they are so gentle they need no training.
any untrained dog allowed to do as it pleases is dangerous, bottom line.
No matter what the breed. In the case of your Bully, training is essential.

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Guest Anonymous

First u need to have sceduled pee pee times. He/she is young so he/she needs more of them it sounds. and when u do u tell him/her what we are going outside to do (pee pee) i tell my pit. when he/she does use it in the house promptly let him smell and tell him/her no and say lets go outside and pee pee and take he/she outside. if finished or not. the first basic thing u must teach your dog is yes and no. get a treat and say no and don't let him/her have it then say yes and give it to him. then get to where u can hold it in front of u without him/her trying to get it. when that is mastered u canput it on the floor and do the same. this will insure the basic understanding of yes and no.
Now when he tries to bite put him in isolation the bathroom is a good place small and normally not much to chew on. he/she needs to know that is not tolerated and he/she cannot be around people when acting this way.
The bad thing is u got a strong minded alfa dog.
When i got my pit he would try to push me out of my seat and if i got up he would promptly jump in my seat and refuse to move so i started sitting on him (hehe) and would apply more presure or stay till he moved.
WHY! cause u are ALFA! I! run this house I sit where i want sleep where i want and do what i want. your puppy like childeren test there limits. but u have to set them and they must apply at all times or your pup will be confused. try not to whip dog its not good the pup might think sence u can hurt me i can hurt u. but i have to say the only thing ever whip dog for is going in the street.

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I agree Dog Lover

hitting a dog will only tend to make it more aggressive in the long run. Positive reinforcement is better - rewards of love, rather than fear of pain.

works well with Children too.

Discipline does not have to be painful, and shouldnt be.

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sorry i'm so late but first let me say I can believe dogs do things to show their displeasure from chewing on things to crapping on the floor right in front of you just to let you know they are not happy. case in point I know a muture golden that has NO separation anxiety but when kept in his crate or a room when the repair man was over crapped all over everything. Why? i still think he does it for attention. to animals, like some children, BAD attention is a substitute for GOOD attention. on that similar note i do believe in physical punishment for all creatures if deserved. With Lecter I went through i nipping stage early on, I bit him back. after a couple of times he never did it again. cause and effect? dum luck? does it work for every dog? I'll never know but at least he doesn't nip hard anymore. just to clarify when I say nip, I'm not talking about "love bites" i mean "OUCH" kinda nip, where if he had done it to a stranger they would think he wanted to eat them. As for our Newbie [color=darkred]welcome to the wonderful world of bully breeds[/color] not to scare you but it will only get worse before it gets better but that is with any breed. My advice is get yourself a crate ASAP and don't leave him alone lose in the house till....well maybe you will never be allowed to do that. Good Luck it's alot of fun and worth every minute of it. There are alot of resources out there on the internet that can help. We are only one of them.

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Guest Anonymous

i would most certainly agree with DOG LOVER
stick to the positive but when a dog does not obey get out of the street
I have no tolerance. I have lost to many buy getting run over.

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Guest Anonymous

The original post should've gone into more detail so that all the great advice given would match the circumstances. First thing is, the puppy is not left alone all day as the children in this home are on summer break and I am the "mom" here and have been home all day also. We acquired the Bulldog puppy under a "too good to be true" circumstance and were not very well educated on the American Bulldog Breed. We already have 2 large male dogs and a military macaw that all want to be the 'Alpha Male" right now. The other dogs we have are very well trained and the bird definitely runs the house......lol. The other 2 learned when bitten 1 time, not to mess with the bird. The puppy however keeps going back for more. I agree that hitting the dog is not an option and even rolling up a newspaper does not work on him. His aggressiveness just gets worse. Since I am the one with him the most, I have learned that the only thing that works is the squirt bottle. Since there are alot of people in the home, it is difficult to always have a reign on things. I've noticed that the only times he repeatedly and viciously bites is when he is being pulled or pushed away from something (i.e. removing him from the couch or coffee table or keeping him away from your food). He refuses to move at all. When we acquired him he had not been taught any manners at all and with patience and time I'm sure he'll come around. I have been inhaling all the information I can about this breed and have been reading books, websites, etc....I will be the first to admit that I was not prepared for such an active and aggressive dog. I have a few questions if anyone has any advice or answers. How closely related are the pitbull and the bulldog(I saw links and references to pitbulls)? How do you enforce a command without getting bit or turning it into another command you have to enforce? Since there are so many people in the home everyone has their own ideas on what to do but I think that 1 person should do the actual training is this correct? and if so, how do you get him to respond positively with everyone else? What has everyone done to keep them from chewing, getting into trash, climbing on furniture,biting? The housebreaking problem is due to fear when confronted by one of the other dogs and also because he has not been trained by previous owners. We are the third home he's gone to and I'm sure that he is just overwhelmed being only 17 weeks old. We have only had him for 2 weeks so just getting all the info and advice we can. Thank you again for all your input.

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I would say the AmB and APBT are 2nd or 3rd cousins in the woodpile. the problem you may face with only one person training the dog is that the dog might not learn to respect ALL members of the "pack" just the trainer. All people in the family must agree to a set of commands and actions that are acceptable and use them. My favorite command to start with is NO. just like with human children you will be saying it ALOT. Since you are with the puppy most of the time I feel it would be best if you started the training but have the others help when the training starts to take. if the dog is chewing state NO, walk over remove the item, if he growls again say NO, and replace the item with a toy or chewwy. Good chewwies are pizzle, pig ears, kongs, tuff kitties, canvas toys, or hard rubber dog toys. you will have to do this often and in the same manner EVERY time. if telling NO, doesn't wrk to stop the growling and aggression, by itself i would use the spray bottle with some diluted lemon or pepper juice and give a shot in the mouth. Now they do make things you can spray or put in the trash can that will help to make it unappealing to the dog but i can't remember what that is. today when you begin training take the pup to a place where it is just the 2 of you if at all possible, Sit would be a good place to start. When it comes to feeding time place the dog in a SIT before you feed him and do not let hm break it till you command, he will get the picture. by always makeing him listen you will move him down the pecking order and with luck the aggression will subside. he sould always come last, last to eat, last to go outside, don't let him on furniture, never let him take the "High" ground and never show him doubt, it will make him question your rank. Now i'm not an animal behaviorist but you might want to consult one in the future should this not be a faze he is going through. Hope this helps and please let us know how it is going, so many people just pop in and get info than disappear and We Really LOVE Updates And PICTURES. :D

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one thing i forgot to mention is you have to study a little about dod pack behavior to help you deal with this. you want to be the ALPHA. you may get some lash back when this starts, since he thinks he is ABOVE you but you must nip it in the bud before he becomes an 90lbs plus dog with an identity problem.

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Guest Anonymous

Thank you for the info BullyGirl. Right now I just have water in the squirt bottle but I never thought of doing a shot in the mouth with lemon or pepper juice. We will keep trying.......how do you post pics here? :D

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DkFairy,
You sound like a great mom for this new pup. I would definately seek the advice of an animal behaviorist to ensure you take all the proper steps with this new bundle of joy. All members of the family should enforce the same rules...it always back fires when every one has their own ideas...every one must be consistant. I have taken in a few dogs which have had major behavioral problems -aggression (I have taken them in when they are adults and all the worst traits seem to be ingrained...I have worked them out with positive reenforcement )
The most important thing is to reward correct behaviour/ redirect incorrect behavior...rewards are out of sight and not given until the correct behaviour is offered/completed...success creates confidence, removes confusion,
massage therapy is also very good...this also gets your pup used to your touching him/her all over...massage the neck, around the face on the muzzle down each leg and rub each toe..and end it with a good old belly rub...belly rubs are great to teach your new pup submissive postioning...it will allow him to relax while being rubbed by all the family members, encourage your children to rub the new pups belly also...I know this sounds stupid, but I have found with the most difficult dogs that this works wonders...associating your hands with pleasure is a great encouragement for your dog. Enroll in puppy obedience right away to socialize your new pup...socialization is very important for any pup...when they play with other pups they learn alot about bite inhibation etc.
The most important thing I can't stress enough is to work with a professional....be it an obedience trainer (with gentle touch training) or consult a behaviorist...don't wait until a problem is ingrained...you have a dominant breed of dog which you don't want to make mistakes with....we can give you all the advice in the world but each dog is an individual and it's best to work in a group with other pups...this will teach your new pup to pay attention to you and not to be easily distracted.
Some really good training exercises for a dominant dog are:
[b]Gentle[/b]: teaches the dog to open its mouth and thus relax the jaw. Tight jaw muscles result in harder bites...use when introducing dog to any other dog or person.
[b]Wait[/b]: dog remains outside of "3 foot" personal space until given permission to go through, use at all doorways and colose perimeters like stairways, use body as a barrier between dog and other humans. It gives fearful dog protection and imposes restriction on assertive dog.
[b]Take it[/b]: dog is allowed to move forward and take object in its mouth. Teach this before you teach "OFF", teaches the time limit for remaining "OFF" an object
[b]OFF[/b]: dog moves head and/or body away form object, gives you leadership and control of space.
[b]Steady[/b]: dog stands quietly while on leash. No forward motion. Standing beside you when dogs are in the distance, decrease distance between your dog and other dogs, introduce motion/distraction.
Approaches/ by passes: can be used in formal or informal settings, always give dog chance for success, use with "gentle" to relax jaws or "off" to increase distance between dogs.
The above exercises are great for a dominant dog, a behaviorist will help you to learn these exercises.
Some suggested reading: The culture clash - Jean Donaldson
Excel-erated Learning- Dr. Pam Reid PhD
Calming Signals - Turid Ruugas
Dog Behaviour - Dr. Ian Dunbar PhD, DVM
The Healing Touch - Dr. Michael Fox DVM
The Dogs Mind - Dr. Bruce Fogel DVM
[quote]We already have 2 large male dogs and a military macaw that all want to be the 'Alpha Male" right now. The other dogs we have are very well trained and the bird definitely runs the house......lol. The other 2 learned when bitten 1 time, not to mess with the bird. The puppy however keeps going back for more. I agree that hitting the dog is not an option and even rolling up a newspaper does not work on him. His aggressiveness just gets worse[/quote]
A pup is naturally curious...but, again I would definately seek the advice of an animal behaviorist to teach you how to properly redirect the pups attention...When I first got my Rottweiler she had been left tied in a back yard for the first year of her life with no socialization...she had never seen a cat before and I have 3 cats!!!! at first I just kept baby gates up so the Rottie could not get the cats (she would go into a frenzy when she saw them) after a year of patience on my part she got used to seeing them in "their area" and they were no longer on her menu...the cats got braver and came up to the baby gate and layed down and stared at her...now the baby gates are down and the Rottie licks the cats and cuddles with them...if I throw a piece of Hamburg down for one of the cats she will sit and watch while drooling...but, she will not try to take the piece of meat from the cat...(of course the cat plays it up and chews real slowly and makes it look soooo good) some times dogs need to just get used to their new roommates, baciscally desensitize them...it took alot of patience on my part (the baby gates where a pain in the behind!)
[color=red][b]Have fun with your new bundle of joy[/b][/color]. Every one has given you great advice...I have worked with animal behaviorists myself as each one of my out of control dogs has required different training...and at times when I look at my Rottie now and how good she is...its hard to beleive she was so messed up when I got her...

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Guest Anonymous

:) Cassie thank you for the one word commands and definitions.....already he has been responding to the lure/treat idea. He already has become immune to the squirt bottle so time to try something new..... :-? Anyhow, I appreciate all the replies; they all help so keep em coming. Caught him in the trash this morning, told him No and then lured him away with a treat and with Good Dog. He responded, wagging his tail and stayed out of the trash. Thanks All!!!!! :D

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