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gooeydog

Books on making food

4 posts in this topic

I've decided to take the plunge into mademade food, as I'm tired of trying various foods and never having one with exactly what I want, plus the way I figure I could be feeding decent meat/veggies (not sure if I can afford the organic/free range route right now, though I have been checking out some places) for about the same cost as all the stuff I'm feeding now. I'll be picking up a few books on the subject when I get my next pay, and also have had several people recommend a nutritionalist in case I run into any problems tailoring things to my dogs (actually, if I play my cards right and can get the meat cheap enough, I may even be able to convince my mom to feed her dogs it as well, which would be great for Haley since she's diabetic and I have no doubt that the grain heavy crap food she's currently eating doesn't help that in the least). My plan is to get a meat/bone grinder and vacuum sealer so I can grind and package my own meals for easy prep, and I will be cooking the food (not incinerating it, just lightly cooking it), at least for a while after starting, so not every raw food book will have info that I can use. So, my current plans are:
Little to no grain
Will feed veggies/fruit, etc
Ground to keep my food bolter from killing herself, and to make it possible to cook the meat/bone
Lightly cooked
Which brings me to the question, what books would best help me out in designing their diets? So far I'm planning on getting Dr. Pitcairns Complete Guide to Natural Health and k9 Kitchen by Monica Segal, also the site I was checking for the books had a booklet of cooked food recipes by the latter that I'll probably get as well. Most of the other books I saw seemed geared more toward raw feeders, so I skipped over them, but if anyone has any other recommendations, I'm open to them.

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pitcairn and segal are two great books to start with if you want to start out with cooking the food. you'll get the most out of them for your money.

in regards to the grinder: i just ordered mine yesterday since i am finally also going to put my 5 cats on raw - and northern tools just has a highly recommended one on sale. :) [url=http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=36989&R=36989]$80 plus shipping instead of $120[/url] :)

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Do you know if that grinder can handle bones as well? That's my main concern since I was hoping to avoid the issues with balancing calcium by feeding meat with bone already there. The grinder I was looking at was about $190 (shipping included), but if this one can do what I need, I sure don't mind saving the money :)

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it can handle soft bones like in chicken and rabbit carcasses, turkey necks and so on. of course you have to cut everything into pieces that fit down the chute, so don't forget to also buy a nice, sharp cleaver if you don't have one already.

you will [b]not[/b] be able to do harder bones like beef and pork necks etc. with any non-commercial grinder and commercial ones run at around $300.

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